3 reasons not to raid your retirement accounts

3 reasons not to raid your retirement accounts401k(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)Life’s little surprises tend to be painfully expensive. No matter how carefully you plan and save for a rainy day, sometimes your financial umbrella just isn’t big enough. When faced with a money emergency, some people may ask family for help, use a home equity line of credit, or even pick up a second job. Many Americans also turn to their retirement accounts, which might lead to larger problems down the road.Retirement piggy banks attract an alarming amount of early withdrawals. According to a report from HelloWallet released last year, more than one out of four households in the country turn to their 401(k) plans before retirement. In some cases, the entire account is drained in an effort to stem financial bleeding somewhere else. Early withdrawals for non-retirement reasons total approximately $60 billion per year, while 401(k) and 403(b) loans account for an additional $10 billion each year.If at all possible, given your personal financial situation, it’s typically recommended that you avoid raiding your retirement accounts. Let’s take a look at three dangers that come with early withdrawals or 401(k) loans.

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Lasix: the drug debate which is bleeding US horse racing dry | Sport |

Lasix: the drug debate which is bleeding US horse racing dry | Sport |
More than 90% of North American racehorses are given Lasix before competing. Photograph: Molly Riley/Getty Images

Few discussions surrounding the use of drugs in US horse racing arise without mention of the race-day medication Furosemide. An anti-bleeding medication, commonly called Lasix or Salix, it is arguably the principal drug that differentiates the US medication regime from other major racing jurisdictions. Elsewhere in the world, almost uniformly, race-day medications are banned.

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Pot shops shunned by banks haul in the cash

Pot shops shunned by banks haul in the cashMoney and drugs(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)The newly budding marijuana industry still carries some vestiges of a back-alley trade as conflicting laws and hazy regulatory guidance have left legal pot-shop proprietors dazed, confused and flush with cash, particularly in Washington State and Colorado, where recreational marijuana sales by retailers began this year.

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